Birds, Bats, or Humans…Gender Matters in Disease Preparedness and Response

14 Sep 2017
02:00 PM - 03:00 PM

Birds, Bats, or Humans…Gender Matters in Disease Preparedness and Response

*Recommended Audience: Introductory/Undergraduate Students, Young Professionals/Graduate Students, and Mid-Level Professionals

Gender disparities have factored significantly in risk, detection, and response during recent zoonotic disease outbreaks such as Ebola, avian influenza, and Zika. Yet many of these biological, social, and economic factors are systematically overlooked during routine planning and coordination by the formal mechanisms designed to address such threats. During this session, participants will apply a simple, cross-sectoral gender analysis framework to an outbreak scenario that will enable them to identify key gender considerations such as family and community caregiving roles, animal and environmental exposures, health-seeking behavior, use of community infrastructure, trade and migration, vulnerability to violence, and access to information. Participants will then examine how government coordination mechanisms can better identify and plan for these issues to enable more effective disease prevention, detection, and response.

Speakers: Jennifer Pendleton, Palladium; Sambe Duale, DAI; Jill Gay, What Works Association